THE day of work is done. Hide my face in your arms, Mother.
Let me dream.
-- Rabindranath Tagore, "Stray Birds"
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Memo 1 YOU CAN'T SLEEP HERE [Buy it!]

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Newhouse Edward  200.00 Biblio Crescent City Books  New York: The Macaulay Company, 1934. Book. Very Good. Hardcover. 8vo - over 7¾ - 9¾" tall. light wear. scarce 1st edition. . 1934. The Macaulay Company US  
Memo 2 You Can't Sleep Here [Buy it!]

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Newhouse Edward  200.00 Biblio ReadInk  New York: The Macaulay Company. Good. (c.1934). First Edition. Hardcover. (no dust jacket) [worn but intact copy, soiling to covers, bumping and fraying at corners and spine ends, moderate darkening/discoloration to spine; internally clean, hinges holding well]. The first of two proletarian novels by this Hungarian-born writer. This one, chronicling the conversion of a young newspaperman to communism, earned him a lot of attention (critic John Chamberlain tagged him "the proletarian Hemingway"); the next ("This is Your Day," published in 1937) about a group of young radicals in Manhattan, further enhanced his leftist literary credentials. However, the author's day job – on the staff of The New Yorker, to which he contributed numerous short stories – ultimately pulled him in the other direction, and by the time he got around to publishing his third novel ("The Hollow of the Wave") in 1949, he had broken with the Communist Party, and used that book was a vehicle for repudiating its philosophies. His prole works (either in accord with his wishes, or because the subject matter was way out of fashion in the postwar era) were never issued in paperback, and have fallen into obscurity, right alongside the author himself. Cited in Rideout (The Radical Novel in the United States); Hanna 2627. . 1934. The Macaulay Company US  
Memo 3 You Can't Sleep Here [Buy it!]

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Newhouse Edward  200.00 ABAA ReadInk  New York: The Macaulay Company. Good. (c.1934). First Edition. Hardcover. (no dust jacket) [worn but intact copy, soiling to covers, bumping and fraying at corners and spine ends, moderate darkening/discoloration to spine; internally clean, hinges holding well]. The first of two proletarian novels by this Hungarian-born writer. This one, chronicling the conversion of a young newspaperman to communism, earned him a lot of attention (critic John Chamberlain tagged him "the proletarian Hemingway"); the next ("This is Your Day," published in 1937) about a group of young radicals in Manhattan, further enhanced his leftist literary credentials. However, the author's day job – on the staff of The New Yorker, to which he contributed numerous short stories – ultimately pulled him in the other direction, and by the time he got around to publishing his third novel ("The Hollow of the Wave") in 1949, he had broken with the Communist Party, and used that book was a vehicle for repudiating its philosophies. His prole works (either in accord with his wishes, or because the subject matter was way out of fashion in the postwar era) were never issued in paperback, and have fallen into obscurity, right alongside the author himself. Cited in Rideout (The Radical Novel in the United States); Hanna 2627. . 1934. The Macaulay Company US  
Memo 4 YOU CAN'T SLEEP HERE [Buy it!]

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Newhouse Edward  200.00 Biblio.co.uk Crescent City Books  New York: The Macaulay Company, 1934. Book. Very Good. Hardcover. 8vo - over 7¾ - 9¾" tall. light wear. scarce 1st edition. . 1934. The Macaulay Company US  
Memo 5 You Can't Sleep Here [Buy it!]

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Newhouse Edward  200.00 Biblio.co.uk ReadInk  New York: The Macaulay Company. Good. (c.1934). First Edition. Hardcover. (no dust jacket) [worn but intact copy, soiling to covers, bumping and fraying at corners and spine ends, moderate darkening/discoloration to spine; internally clean, hinges holding well]. The first of two proletarian novels by this Hungarian-born writer. This one, chronicling the conversion of a young newspaperman to communism, earned him a lot of attention (critic John Chamberlain tagged him "the proletarian Hemingway"); the next ("This is Your Day," published in 1937) about a group of young radicals in Manhattan, further enhanced his leftist literary credentials. However, the author's day job – on the staff of The New Yorker, to which he contributed numerous short stories – ultimately pulled him in the other direction, and by the time he got around to publishing his third novel ("The Hollow of the Wave") in 1949, he had broken with the Communist Party, and used that book was a vehicle for repudiating its philosophies. His prole works (either in accord with his wishes, or because the subject matter was way out of fashion in the postwar era) were never issued in paperback, and have fallen into obscurity, right alongside the author himself. Cited in Rideout (The Radical Novel in the United States); Hanna 2627. . 1934. The Macaulay Company US  
Memo 6 You Can't Sleep Here[Buy it!]

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NEWHOUSE, EDWARD  200.00 Antiqbook ReadInk [USA]  New York: The Macaulay Company, (c.1934). First Edition. Hardcover. (no dust jacket) [worn but intact copy, soiling to covers, bumping and fraying at corners and spine ends, moderate darkening/discoloration to spine; internally clean, hinges holding well]. The first of two proletarian novels by this Hungarian-born writer. This one, chronicling the conversion of a young newspaperman to communism, earned him a lot of attention (critic John Chamberlain tagged him "the proletarian Hemingway"); the next ("This is Your Day," published in 1937) about a group of young radicals in Manhattan, further enhanced his leftist literary credentials. However, the author's day job on the staff of The New Yorker, to which he contributed numerous short stories ultimately pulled him in the other direction, and by the time he got around to publishing his third novel ("The Hollow of the Wave") in 1949, he had broken with the Communist Party, and used that book was a vehicle for repudiating its philosophies. His prole works (either in accord with his wishes, or because the subject matter was way out of fashion in the postwar era) were never issued in paperback, and have fallen into obscurity, right alongside the author himself. Cited in Rideout (The Radical Novel in the United States); Hanna 2627.. Good . (with PICTURE)  
Memo 7 You Can't Sleep Here[Buy it!]

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Newhouse, Edward  200.00 Abebooks ReadInk, ABAA/IOBA  [publisher: The Macaulay Company (c.1934), New York] First Edition (no dust jacket) [worn but intact copy, soiling to covers, bumping and fraying at corners and spine ends, moderate darkening/discoloration to spine; internally clean, hinges holding well]. The first of two proletarian novels by this Hungarian-born writer. This one, chronicling the conversion of a young newspaperman to communism, earned him a lot of attention (critic John Chamberlain tagged him "the proletarian Hemingway"); the next ("This is Your Day," published in 1937) about a group of young radicals in Manhattan, further enhanced his leftist literary credentials. However, the author's day job – on the staff of The New Yorker, to which he contributed numerous short stories – ultimately pulled him in the other direction, and by the time he got around to publishing his third novel ("The Hollow of the Wave") in 1949, he had broken with the Communist Party, and used that book was a vehicle for repudiating its philosophies. His prole works (either in accord with his wishes, or because the subject matter was way out of fashion in the postwar era) were never issued in paperback, and have fallen into obscurity, right alongside the author himself. Cited in Rideout (The Radical Novel in the United States); Hanna 2627. [Los Angeles, CA, U.S.A.]  
Memo 8 YOU CAN'T SLEEP HERE[Buy it!]

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Newhouse, Edward  200.00 Abebooks Crescent City Books, Inc.  [publisher: The Macaulay Company, New York] light wear. scarce 1st edition. [New Orleans, LA, U.S.A.]  
Memo 9 You Can't Sleep Here[Buy it!]

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Newhouse, Edward  400.00 Alibris ManofBooks via Alibris  NYC Macaulay 1934 Hardcover VG+ pp. 252.  
Memo 10 You Can't Sleep Here[Buy it!]

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Newhouse, Edward  400.00 Abebooks ManOfBooks  [publisher: Macaulay NYC 1934] First Edition bright yellowish brown boards with black label and title on front panel, and sp;ine 252 Book Condition - VG+, First Edition. Hardcover [Washington, D.C., DC, U.S.A.]  
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